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Not in the near term. We have a number of beta testers using parallels, which works reasonably well. All our new products from here on out will have this sort of functionality, so maybe a native Mac version in q4 or 2016, but it isn't on our firm development schedule yet.

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From a developers standpoint, what is the interfacing to this?  Is it JS in eclipse? or higher level?  I am interested in building discreet/custom wire profiles for our various wire products.  Is it going to be possible to build non-linear PTC scalars?  I.E. develop a TC scalar for each discreet product.  We have the necessary gear in our lab to test calibrations at various energy/heat levels.  I would like to give my customers a downloadable file for each of our wire compositions and sizes.  Thanks in advance.

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John so if I export thermocouple data, plus resistance data tend curves straight to .CSV (my equipment can lock to sample clock so the trends are time correlated) I can just bring that trend straight into eScribe?  No hard scripting necessary?  That would be very nice.  Also can the software/firmware handle non linear points in the trend curve?  Our wire has some unique properties at saturation.....it transitions from a linear PTC to a sawtooth when it hits temp saturation.  So in essence I would like to have a calibrated scalar for each discreet wire product, that conforms to a reasonable degree of sDev accuracy across the coil surface.  I am assuming this can easily be done with a traditional PTC scalar measurement method?  Thanks, this is very good news indeed.  :thumb:

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SSV, Maybe I am not understanding your post, but I don't see how a sawtooth could be implemented with simple resistance measurement TC. That would necessitate that the wire has a negative coefficient on the trailing edge of the sawtooth? How would the device know which side of the sawtooth it is on just by measuring resistance?

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Alexander, this is why I asked.  You could track the tail (low side) of the sawtooth with a param for a "decrease" in resistance.....and implement a corrective lockout to NOT throttle power when that waveform is seen over X time.  We do this quite often in other thermistors, when they reach saturation maximums and become non linear....I have a lot of experience with dc/dc controllers and we typically do this through hysteresis

EDIT : here is a reasonably good article that might peak your interests https://sensorsandtransducers.wordpress.com/2012/02/07/thermistors/

because of the quantization of a 10 or 12 bit a/d the pure sine will be interpenetrated as a sawtooth.....in a 24 or 32 bit system we can get scalars that are more analogous to actual input waveforms, but I doubt it would be practical to implement a 24/32 bit a/d and associated vRef with any kind of stability in response....so we are stuck with interpolation errors, that look like a sawtooth

thankfully most modern McU have a hysteresis object library, to correct for such "problems".....simply patching a hysteresis control algorithm into the DO loop can help "smooth" the curve

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I am fairly certain I read somewhere that it would only take increasing resistance values but I can't find the reference. I remember because I saw a curve one time that plateaued and went back down before increasing again and it made me think about what would happen in a closed loop system with simple resistance feedback.

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Alexander, have a look at the last post I made to you....I amended it with some more information on how we can solve these potential "issues".....this is a fairly common subject we encounter, when dealing with thermistors, thermo couples, and RTD controllers


hysteresis is the name of the game =)

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